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Columbine Leaf

This pattern uses chain, slip stitch & single crochet. You will need to know how to work with padding cord and how to read charts.

Materials:
Crochet thread and appropriately sized hook. Suggested: size 10 & 1.75mm hook, size 20 & 1.5mm hook, size 30 & 1.25mm hook. Leaves will be 1.5″, 1.25″ and 1″ long respectively.

Gauge:
Not essential, use medium tension on all stitches except the chains which should be done loosely.

Notes:
Make turns counterclockwise. Not only does it give a slightly smoother edge, the chains will disappear if you make turns clockwise.

I use a long tail, 36″+, as the padding cord. Pull padding cord after each row, pull more tightly to make leaf edges rounded.

Making the stitches into BLO will result in a more textured leaf, try both ways and see which you prefer!

 


Copyright 2016 FoxStitch Design

You may not sell, reproduce, redistribute, or create derivatives, including translations, of this pattern without written permission.

Trying to restrict what you do with the finished items is unenforceable and silly. Do whatever you want with your finished items!

Printable PDF

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Pansy Leaf


This pattern uses chain, slip stitch & single crochet. You will need to know how to work with padding cord and how to read charts.

NEW: “Getting Started” info has been added below the link to the printable PDF.

Materials:
Crochet thread and appropriately sized hook. Suggested: size 10 & 1.75mm hook, size 20 & 1.5mm hook, size 30 & 1.25mm hook. Leaves will be 1.5″, 1.25″ and 1″ long respectively.

Gauge:
Not essential, use medium tension on all stitches except the chains which should be done loosely.

Notes:
Make turns counterclockwise. Not only does it give a slightly smoother edge, the chains will disappear if you make turns clockwise.

I use a long tail, 16″ to 24″, as the padding cord. Pull padding cord after each row, pull more tightly to make leaf edges rounded.

Making the stitches into BLO will result in a more textured leaf, try both ways and see which you prefer!


Copyright 2016 FoxStitch Design

You may not sell, reproduce, redistribute, or create derivatives, including translations, of this pattern without written permission.

Trying to restrict what you do with the finished items is unenforceable and silly. Do whatever you want with your finished items!

Printable PDF

This kind of design just doesn’t lend itself to be fully written out (mostly because of having to make stitches into stitches made in rows many rows previous).  It’s clearer in chart form.  However you may find the “Getting Started” info below helpful as you begin.

The dotted lines show you where on an earlier row the sc needs to be made. Sometimes it’s just the previous row, sometimes it’s a much earlier row. The light blue line tells you to include the padding cord when you make the stitch.

Padding cord is most often used to add bulk but that’s NOT how it’s used for this leaf. For most of the leaf it is just carried along.

Make a slip knot a long way from the end of the thread and use just the tail as padding cord. It’s used so you can make stitches directly on to it (instead of into another stitch) and so you can use it kind of like a drawstring to make the ends of the lobes more rounded and smooth.

You would begin this way:
Seven sc onto the padding cord, ch1, turn. Drop the padding cord.

Sc into the last two sc from first row, a slip stitch in the next st, ch1, turn.

Skip ch, sl st in the next sc, sc into next 2 sts, 2 sc onto just the padding cord. turn.

The cord is then held on top of the stitches and you work INTO the stitches and are just carrying the cord along and it is trapped.

So…

A sc into each of the 2 sc from the 3rd row, a sc into the sl st, a sc into the ch, a sc into the 4th sc of the FIRST ROW, another sc into the next st of the first row, a sl st into the next st of the first row, ch1, turn.

Just be sure you are catching the padding cord with every SC, it’s easy to forget about it and when it’s time to make stitches onto JUST the cord (the red crosses), it’s nowhere to be found.

The arrows across mean to slip st into the chain from the other side.