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Pansies

Easiest one first, you had previously gotten a dark red one like these although I am not sure it had the shaded leaves. $12, two available.

The group below is the “one color” pansies, I either dyed the thread first or dyed a white pansy after crocheting. This group photo was taken outdoors but with indirect lighting.

Below was taken in sunlight. I would give these solid color leaves. $12.50 each.

  • B1 – very bright, kind of a vivid rose color
  • B2- blue but a hint of periwinkle
  • B3 – a neutral blue
  • B4 – bright citrus yellow
  • B5 – minimal shading but pretty soft purple color
  • B6 – sky blue with lighter edge
  • B7 – sky blue with wide white edge. This one had a little blue dye get in the yellow center. I don’t consider it ruined, it’s just different.
  • B8 – Similar color but the opposite of B5, a lot of contrast

Below was taken in sunlight. I would give these shaded leaves. $13 each.

  • C1 – Bright red leaning ever so slightly to orange
  • C2 – a strong berry color, I’ve seen it called mulberry or boysenberry. Closer to purple than red.
  • C3 – Very periwinkle, more so than it looks in photo
  • C4 – I’d call this royal blue
  • C5 – Bright red with no hint of orange. A new color for me and my new favorite real red. It’s REALLY red.
  • C6 – Medium purple, neither warm nor cool.
  • C7 – I’d call this midnight blue, a little darker and a little more purple than C4.
  • C8 – A blue that looks good with denim. It looks duller when with the other brighter blues but alone it’s nice. I have used this color for years because it looks good with so many other colors.

These would also get shaded leaves, D1 is $12, the rest are $13 each. It just made more sense to group them like this. The bold contrast can look better on a busy background than some of the more delicately colored pansies.

  • D1 – Same dark red as A1 with snow white.
  • D2 – Navy with snow white.
  • D3 – Bright pumpkin red-orange with snow white. I don’t like this one, but I don’t really like orange… Some do.
  • D4 – Warm purple with snow white.
  • D5 – Medium berry color, similar to C2 above but lighter, with snow white.

Below are the two color pansies, two separate dye steps.

This group has that berry color for the face. The cantaloupe and pastel cantaloupe are just different strengths of the same color but the pastel version seems more creamy. I like 1 & 2 more than 4 & 5. I’d give these shaded leaves. $14 each.

  • E1 – Pastel cantaloupe with dark berry face
  • E2 – Cantaloupe with dark berry face
  • E3 – Citrus yellow with dark berry face
  • E4 – Pastel cantaloupe with medium berry face, much less red than photo, similar in color to D5.
  • E5 – Cantaloupe with medium berry face

The ones on the right were all made with the same batch of dye, just different strengths. I love this new-to-me purple. These would get solid leaves. $13.50 each.

  • F1 – Just an experiment to see if I could get the edge of the face smoother. That blue doesn’t go with that yellow (IMO). You can have it free as-is or I’ll keep as a “what not to do”.
  • F2 – Medium purple and light purple
  • F3 – Royal purple and light purple
  • F4 – Royal blue and yellow, same blue as C4.
  • F5 – Medium purple and light purple.
  • F6 – Royal purple and light purple.
  • F7 – Royal Purple and medium to light purple

These took at least three dyeing steps. They would get solid leaves. $14.50 each. First photo is in shade, the 2nd in sunlight.

  • G1 & G2 – Trying to recreate the Beaconsfield pansy.
  • G3 – Citrus with very light almost periwinkle edge.
  • G4 – Shades of cantaloupe
  • G5 – Royal blue face with lighter shades of the same color.
  • G6 – It’s very pink! The darkest part of the face is like B1.

And finally, the johnny jump ups. I’m keeping these in sets of 3 and have decided to keep the top complicated set. The only difference between the two lower sets is the size of the white side petals, H1 has slightly large side petals than H2.

These are made from extremely fine thread and have a different texture than the regular pansies. These are hard to make and I don’t plan on making them regularly, consider them special edition. They would be $45 per set without leaves or $60 a set with tiny leaves made from the same fine thread. Regular pansy (B8) to give you a sense of scale.

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Columbine Leaf

This pattern uses chain, slip stitch & single crochet. You will need to know how to work with padding cord and how to read charts.

Materials:
Crochet thread and appropriately sized hook. Suggested: size 10 & 1.75mm hook, size 20 & 1.5mm hook, size 30 & 1.25mm hook. Leaves will be 1.5″, 1.25″ and 1″ long respectively.

Gauge:
Not essential, use medium tension on all stitches except the chains which should be done loosely.

Notes:
Make turns counterclockwise. Not only does it give a slightly smoother edge, the chains will disappear if you make turns clockwise.

I use a long tail, 36″+, as the padding cord. Pull padding cord after each row, pull more tightly to make leaf edges rounded.

Making the stitches into BLO will result in a more textured leaf, try both ways and see which you prefer!

 


Copyright 2016 FoxStitch Design

You may not sell, reproduce, redistribute, or create derivatives, including translations, of this pattern without written permission.

Trying to restrict what you do with the finished items is unenforceable and silly. Do whatever you want with your finished items!

Printable PDF

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Pansy Leaf


This pattern uses chain, slip stitch & single crochet. You will need to know how to work with padding cord and how to read charts.

Materials:
Crochet thread and appropriately sized hook. Suggested: size 10 & 1.75mm hook, size 20 & 1.5mm hook, size 30 & 1.25mm hook. Leaves will be 1.5″, 1.25″ and 1″ long respectively.

Gauge:
Not essential, use medium tension on all stitches except the chains which should be done loosely.

Notes:
Make turns counterclockwise. Not only does it give a slightly smoother edge, the chains will disappear if you make turns clockwise.

I use a long tail, 16″ to 24″, as the padding cord. Pull padding cord after each row, pull more tightly to make leaf edges rounded.

Making the stitches into BLO will result in a more textured leaf, try both ways and see which you prefer!

 


Copyright 2016 FoxStitch Design

You may not sell, reproduce, redistribute, or create derivatives, including translations, of this pattern without written permission.

Trying to restrict what you do with the finished items is unenforceable and silly. Do whatever you want with your finished items!

Printable PDF